FCKH8 – The Teachers Can’t Talk

What goes against the laws of nature / where choice fits into the whole melee / what church’s say about the whole thing and even the dialogue approved for teachers in Tennessee… These are just a few of the foolish issues that have inspired the FCKH8 movement, represented by these beyond-kooky viral videos.

Sure, I thought they were a little loud at first too, but the irony of who is saying what is being said should be enough to keep you going. And when you hear of some of things this movement is looking to overturn, you might even consider turning browsing to wardrobe-buying.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctGg8e8BR9M&feature=related

I did.

Join the movement.

© Dylan Balkind

Want to know what this is all about?

A Tennessee state Senate committee has passed a bill to make sure teachers don’t mention homosexuality in classes below ninth grade. The “don’t say gay” bill got it passed 6-3 after some legal wrangling, and it now moves to the Senate floor. It states: “No public elementary or middle school shall provide any instruction or material that discusses sexual orientation other than heterosexuality.” Reference.

All in all; “It means they can’t talk about gay issues or sexuality even with students who may be gay or have gay family.”

Online: Provoking thought across the planet

Online is a captivating space to create hype. We search, read, watch, learn, like and share what we find. Work. Play. Listen. Click. Connect. It’s how we are now. The argument that this reinvented way of life is anti-social doesn’t consider how social – and socially conscious – this online medium can be.

Unicef is on a mission to give 93 million children access to education – the cost of which cannot be billed to their home address. So to get you involved, some clever minds sat down with Google Chrome and conceptualised, created and implemented a plan to seize your online attention, win you over and ultimately have you wanting to donate some of what’s in your bank account to what they need in theirs.

To raise donations, Unicef capitalised on what you do all day to get you involved: searching for information online. Not everyone is a walking dictionary (no, not even a Copywriter), so the chance that you may need Google or Word to suggest a correction was utilised to get you to donate, turning misspelled words into bottom-line results through Donate a Word. With a prompt to their website, Unicef is pretty much guaranteed an impressed browser in the right frame of mind. Five characters cost you fifty cents – not much to you but important to them. And with Google search, Unicef gets to spread its message even further.

The innovative and artistic genius that is Lady Gaga (and the team that helps her be so) snatched up the opportunity to reel in audiences while partaking in one of their other obsessions: Facebook’s FarmVille. GagaVille gave ‘farmers’ a week’s head’s-up on listening to the new album from the empress of eccentricity. Love her and what she has to say, or loathe it and be left behind, there is credit due for revolutionising the way in which she connects with her fans – another prowess of online. Crystals, unicorns and sheep on motorcycles (why not, right?) partnered the Born This Way experience on FarmVille, with the focus steadfast on positivity and self-expression. Nothing says self expression quite like a FarmVille unicorn.

When you think about Gaga and Farmville’s original partnership that raised $3million for Japan, it’s clear that her online leverage and Unicef’s is not so different after all. It’s where we spend most of our time, so it makes sense, right? Just think what it can do for your brand.

© Copywriter Dylan Balkind

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